aspecd.annotation module

Annotations of data, e.g. characteristics, that cannot be automated.

Annotations of data (and plots, i.e. graphical representations of data) are eventually something that cannot be automated. Nevertheless, they can be quite important for the analysis and hence for providing new scientific insight. Furthermore, annotations of data can sometimes be added to a graphical representation. A typical example would be to mark an artefact with an asterisk or to highlight a characteristic. Therefore, dataset annotations may have graphical realisations as plot annotations.

Dataset annotations

All dataset annotations inherit from the aspecd.annotation.DatasetAnnotation base class.

Concrete dataset annotations are:

  • aspecd.annotation.Comment

    The simplest form of an annotation is a comment applying to an entire dataset, such as comments stored in the metadata written during data acquisition. Hence, those comments do not belong to the metadata part of a dataset, but are stored as an annotation using this class.

Other frequent types of annotations are artefacts and characteristics, for which dedicated classes are available within the ASpecD framework:

Todo

Flesh out these additional DatasetAnnotation classes, particularly in light of the newly created PlotAnnotation classes that may eventually be a way to graphically display the dataset annotations.

For other types of annotations, simply subclass the aspecd.annotation.DatasetAnnotation base class.

Plot(ter) annotations

Similar to datasets, plots, i.e. graphical representations of the data of one or multiple datasets, can be annotated as well. Plot annotations will always result in a graphical object of some kind added to the plot created by a aspecd.plotting.Plotter. Additionally, each plotter has a list of annotations attached to it. As such, plot annotations are independent of individual datasets and can span multiple datasets in case of plotters involving the data of multiple datasets.

While generally, it should not matter whether a plot annotation gets added to the plotter object before or after the actual plotting process, adding the graphical elements annotations consist eventually of to the plot is only possible once the aspecd.plotting.Plotter.plot() method has been called and the respective aspecd.plotting.Plotter.figure and aspecd.plotting.Plotter.axes attributes are set. To this end, a plot annotation will only actually add graphical elements if the plot exists already, and the plotter will in turn add any annotations added prior to plotting when its aspecd.plotting.Plotter.plot() method is called. This avoids side effects, as annotating a plotter does not create a graphical representation that did not exist before.

All plot annotations inherit from the aspecd.annotation.PlotAnnotation base class.

Concrete plot annotations are:

Module documentation

class aspecd.annotation.DatasetAnnotation

Bases: aspecd.utils.ToDictMixin

Annotations are user-supplied additional information to datasets.

Whereas many processing steps of data can be fully automated, annotations are mostly the domain of human interaction, looking at the data of a dataset and providing some sort of comments, trying to make sense of the data.

Annotations can have different types, such as simple “comments”, e.g. saying that a dataset is not useful as something during measurement went wrong, they can highlight “characteristics” of the data, they can point to “artefacts”. Each of these types is represented by a class on its own that is derived from the DatasetAnnotation base class. Additionally, the type is reflected in the “type” property that gets set automatically to the class name in lower-case letters.

Each annotation has a scope (such as “point”, “slice”, “area”, “distance”, “dataset”) it belongs to, and a “contents” property (dict) containing the actual content of the annotation.

type

Textual description of the type of annotation: lowercase class name

Set automatically, don’t change

Type

str

content

Actual content of the annotation

Generic place for more information

Type

dict

dataset

Dataset the annotation belongs to

Type

aspecd.dataset.Dataset

Raises
  • aspecd.annotation.NoContentError – Raised when annotation contains no content(s)

  • aspecd.annotation.MissingDatasetError – Raised when no dataset exists to act on

property scope

Get or set the scope the annotation applies to.

The list of allowed scopes is stored in the private property _allowed_scopes, and if no scope is set when the annotation is finally applied to a dataset, a default scope will be used that is stored in the private property _default_scope (and is defined as one element of the list of allowed scopes)

Currently, allowed scopes are: dataset, slice, point, area, distance.

annotate(dataset=None, from_dataset=False)

Annotate a dataset with the given annotation.

If no dataset is provided at method call, but is set as property in the Annotation object, the aspecd.dataset.Dataset.annotate() method of the dataset will be called and thus the history written.

If no dataset is provided at method call nor as property in the object, the method will raise a respective exception.

If no scope is set in the aspecd.annotation.Annotation object, a default value will be used that can be set in derived classes in the private property _default_scope. A full list of scopes is contained in the private property _allowed_scopes. See the scope property for details.

The aspecd.dataset.Dataset object always calls this method with the respective dataset as argument. Therefore, in this case setting the dataset property within the Annotation object is not necessary.

Parameters
  • dataset (aspecd.dataset.Dataset) – dataset to annotate

  • from_dataset (bool) –

    whether we are called from within a dataset

    Defaults to “False” and shall never be set manually.

Returns

dataset – dataset that has been annotated

Return type

aspecd.dataset.Dataset

create_history_record()

Create history record to be added to the dataset.

Usually, this method gets called from within the aspecd.dataset.Dataset.annotate() method of the aspecd.dataset.Dataset class and ensures the history of each annotation step to get written properly.

Returns

history_record – history record for annotation step

Return type

aspecd.history.AnnotationHistoryRecord

to_dict(remove_empty=False)

Create dictionary containing public attributes of an object.

Parameters

remove_empty (bool) –

Whether to remove keys with empty values

Default: False

Returns

public_attributes – Ordered dictionary containing the public attributes of the object

The order of attribute definition is preserved

Return type

collections.OrderedDict

Changed in version 0.6: New parameter remove_empty

Changed in version 0.9: Settings for properties to exclude and include are not traversed

Changed in version 0.9.1: Dictionaries get copied before traversing, as otherwise, the special variables __dict__ and __0dict__ are modified, what may result in strange behaviour.

class aspecd.annotation.Comment

Bases: aspecd.annotation.DatasetAnnotation

The most basic form of annotation: a simple textual comment.

property comment

Get comment of annotation.

Returns

comment – Actual comment string

Return type

str

annotate(dataset=None, from_dataset=False)

Annotate a dataset with the given annotation.

If no dataset is provided at method call, but is set as property in the Annotation object, the aspecd.dataset.Dataset.annotate() method of the dataset will be called and thus the history written.

If no dataset is provided at method call nor as property in the object, the method will raise a respective exception.

If no scope is set in the aspecd.annotation.Annotation object, a default value will be used that can be set in derived classes in the private property _default_scope. A full list of scopes is contained in the private property _allowed_scopes. See the scope property for details.

The aspecd.dataset.Dataset object always calls this method with the respective dataset as argument. Therefore, in this case setting the dataset property within the Annotation object is not necessary.

Parameters
  • dataset (aspecd.dataset.Dataset) – dataset to annotate

  • from_dataset (bool) –

    whether we are called from within a dataset

    Defaults to “False” and shall never be set manually.

Returns

dataset – dataset that has been annotated

Return type

aspecd.dataset.Dataset

create_history_record()

Create history record to be added to the dataset.

Usually, this method gets called from within the aspecd.dataset.Dataset.annotate() method of the aspecd.dataset.Dataset class and ensures the history of each annotation step to get written properly.

Returns

history_record – history record for annotation step

Return type

aspecd.history.AnnotationHistoryRecord

property scope

Get or set the scope the annotation applies to.

The list of allowed scopes is stored in the private property _allowed_scopes, and if no scope is set when the annotation is finally applied to a dataset, a default scope will be used that is stored in the private property _default_scope (and is defined as one element of the list of allowed scopes)

Currently, allowed scopes are: dataset, slice, point, area, distance.

to_dict(remove_empty=False)

Create dictionary containing public attributes of an object.

Parameters

remove_empty (bool) –

Whether to remove keys with empty values

Default: False

Returns

public_attributes – Ordered dictionary containing the public attributes of the object

The order of attribute definition is preserved

Return type

collections.OrderedDict

Changed in version 0.6: New parameter remove_empty

Changed in version 0.9: Settings for properties to exclude and include are not traversed

Changed in version 0.9.1: Dictionaries get copied before traversing, as otherwise, the special variables __dict__ and __0dict__ are modified, what may result in strange behaviour.

class aspecd.annotation.Artefact

Bases: aspecd.annotation.DatasetAnnotation

Mark something as an artefact.

annotate(dataset=None, from_dataset=False)

Annotate a dataset with the given annotation.

If no dataset is provided at method call, but is set as property in the Annotation object, the aspecd.dataset.Dataset.annotate() method of the dataset will be called and thus the history written.

If no dataset is provided at method call nor as property in the object, the method will raise a respective exception.

If no scope is set in the aspecd.annotation.Annotation object, a default value will be used that can be set in derived classes in the private property _default_scope. A full list of scopes is contained in the private property _allowed_scopes. See the scope property for details.

The aspecd.dataset.Dataset object always calls this method with the respective dataset as argument. Therefore, in this case setting the dataset property within the Annotation object is not necessary.

Parameters
  • dataset (aspecd.dataset.Dataset) – dataset to annotate

  • from_dataset (bool) –

    whether we are called from within a dataset

    Defaults to “False” and shall never be set manually.

Returns

dataset – dataset that has been annotated

Return type

aspecd.dataset.Dataset

create_history_record()

Create history record to be added to the dataset.

Usually, this method gets called from within the aspecd.dataset.Dataset.annotate() method of the aspecd.dataset.Dataset class and ensures the history of each annotation step to get written properly.

Returns

history_record – history record for annotation step

Return type

aspecd.history.AnnotationHistoryRecord

property scope

Get or set the scope the annotation applies to.

The list of allowed scopes is stored in the private property _allowed_scopes, and if no scope is set when the annotation is finally applied to a dataset, a default scope will be used that is stored in the private property _default_scope (and is defined as one element of the list of allowed scopes)

Currently, allowed scopes are: dataset, slice, point, area, distance.

to_dict(remove_empty=False)

Create dictionary containing public attributes of an object.

Parameters

remove_empty (bool) –

Whether to remove keys with empty values

Default: False

Returns

public_attributes – Ordered dictionary containing the public attributes of the object

The order of attribute definition is preserved

Return type

collections.OrderedDict

Changed in version 0.6: New parameter remove_empty

Changed in version 0.9: Settings for properties to exclude and include are not traversed

Changed in version 0.9.1: Dictionaries get copied before traversing, as otherwise, the special variables __dict__ and __0dict__ are modified, what may result in strange behaviour.

class aspecd.annotation.Characteristic

Bases: aspecd.annotation.DatasetAnnotation

Base class for characteristics.

annotate(dataset=None, from_dataset=False)

Annotate a dataset with the given annotation.

If no dataset is provided at method call, but is set as property in the Annotation object, the aspecd.dataset.Dataset.annotate() method of the dataset will be called and thus the history written.

If no dataset is provided at method call nor as property in the object, the method will raise a respective exception.

If no scope is set in the aspecd.annotation.Annotation object, a default value will be used that can be set in derived classes in the private property _default_scope. A full list of scopes is contained in the private property _allowed_scopes. See the scope property for details.

The aspecd.dataset.Dataset object always calls this method with the respective dataset as argument. Therefore, in this case setting the dataset property within the Annotation object is not necessary.

Parameters
  • dataset (aspecd.dataset.Dataset) – dataset to annotate

  • from_dataset (bool) –

    whether we are called from within a dataset

    Defaults to “False” and shall never be set manually.

Returns

dataset – dataset that has been annotated

Return type

aspecd.dataset.Dataset

create_history_record()

Create history record to be added to the dataset.

Usually, this method gets called from within the aspecd.dataset.Dataset.annotate() method of the aspecd.dataset.Dataset class and ensures the history of each annotation step to get written properly.

Returns

history_record – history record for annotation step

Return type

aspecd.history.AnnotationHistoryRecord

property scope

Get or set the scope the annotation applies to.

The list of allowed scopes is stored in the private property _allowed_scopes, and if no scope is set when the annotation is finally applied to a dataset, a default scope will be used that is stored in the private property _default_scope (and is defined as one element of the list of allowed scopes)

Currently, allowed scopes are: dataset, slice, point, area, distance.

to_dict(remove_empty=False)

Create dictionary containing public attributes of an object.

Parameters

remove_empty (bool) –

Whether to remove keys with empty values

Default: False

Returns

public_attributes – Ordered dictionary containing the public attributes of the object

The order of attribute definition is preserved

Return type

collections.OrderedDict

Changed in version 0.6: New parameter remove_empty

Changed in version 0.9: Settings for properties to exclude and include are not traversed

Changed in version 0.9.1: Dictionaries get copied before traversing, as otherwise, the special variables __dict__ and __0dict__ are modified, what may result in strange behaviour.

class aspecd.annotation.PlotAnnotation

Bases: aspecd.utils.ToDictMixin

Base class for annotations for graphical representations (plots).

Whereas many processing steps of data can be fully automated, annotations are mostly the domain of human interaction, looking at the graphical representation of the data of a dataset and providing some sort of comments, trying to make sense of the data. Often, being able to add some kind of annotation to these graphical representations is both, tremendously helpful and required for further analysis.

Annotations can have different types, such as horizontal and vertical lines added to a plot for comparing different data.

Each of these types is represented by a class on its own that is derived from the PlotAnnotation base class. Additionally, the type is reflected in the “type” property that gets set automatically to the class name in lower-case letters.

While generally, it should not matter whether a plot annotation gets added to the plotter object before or after the actual plotting process, adding the graphical elements annotations consist eventually of to the plot is only possible once the aspecd.plotting.Plotter.plot() method has been called and the respective aspecd.plotting.Plotter.figure and aspecd.plotting.Plotter.axes attributes are set. To this end, a plot annotation will only actually add graphical elements if the plot exists already, and the plotter will in turn add any annotations added prior to plotting when its aspecd.plotting.Plotter.plot() method is called. This avoids side effects, as annotating a plotter does not create a graphical representation that did not exist before.

plotter

Plotter the annotation belongs to

Type

aspecd.plotting.Plotter

type

Textual description of the type of annotation: lowercase class name

Set automatically, don’t change

Type

str

parameters

All parameters necessary for the annotation, implicit and explicit

Type

dict

properties

Properties of the annotation, defining its appearance

Type

None

drawings

Actual graphical representations of the annotation within the plot

Type

list

Examples

For examples of how such a report task may be included into a recipe, see below:

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  properties:
    filename: plot1Dstacked.pdf
  result: plot1Dstacked

- kind: plotannotation
  type: VerticalLine
  properties:
    parameters:
      positions: [35, 42]
    properties:
      color: green
      linewidth: 1
      linestyle: dotted
  plotter: plot1Dstacked

In this case, the plotter is defined first, and the annotation second. To refer to the plotter from within the plotannotation task, you need to set the result attribute in the plotting task and refer to it within the plotter attribute of the plotannotation task. Although defining the plotter before the annotation, the user still expects the annotation to be included in the file containing the actual plot, despite the fact that the figure has been saved (for the first time) before the annotation has been added.

Sometimes, it might be convenient to go the other way round and first define an annotation and afterwards add it to a plot(ter). This can be done as well:

- kind: plotannotation
  type: VerticalLine
  properties:
    parameters:
      positions:
        - 21
        - 42
    properties:
      color: green
      linewidth: 1
      linestyle: dotted
  result: vlines

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  properties:
    filename: plot1Dstacked.pdf
  annotations:
    - vlines

In this way, you can add the same annotation to several plots, and be sure that each annotation is handled as a separate object.

Suppose you have more than one plotter you want to apply an annotation to. In this case, the plotter property of the plotannotation task is a list rather than a string:

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  result: plot1

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  result: plot2

- kind: plotannotation
  type: VerticalLine
  properties:
    parameters:
      positions: [35, 42]
  plotter:
    - plot1
    - plot2

In this case, the annotation will be applied to both plots independently. Note that the example has been reduced to the key aspects. In a real situation, the two plotters will differ much more.

New in version 0.9.

annotate(plotter=None, from_plotter=False)

Annotate a plot(ter) with the given annotation.

If no plotter is provided at method call, but is set as property in the Annotation object, the aspecd.plotting.Plotter.annotate() method of the plotter will be called and thus the history written.

If no plotter is provided at method call nor as property in the object, the method will raise a respective exception.

Parameters
  • plotter (aspecd.plotting.Plotter) – Plot(ter) to annotate

  • from_plotter (bool) –

    whether we are called from within a plotter

    Defaults to “False” and shall never be set manually.

Returns

plotter – Plotter that has been annotated

Return type

aspecd.plotting.Plotter

to_dict(remove_empty=False)

Create dictionary containing public attributes of an object.

Parameters

remove_empty (bool) –

Whether to remove keys with empty values

Default: False

Returns

public_attributes – Ordered dictionary containing the public attributes of the object

The order of attribute definition is preserved

Return type

collections.OrderedDict

Changed in version 0.6: New parameter remove_empty

Changed in version 0.9: Settings for properties to exclude and include are not traversed

Changed in version 0.9.1: Dictionaries get copied before traversing, as otherwise, the special variables __dict__ and __0dict__ are modified, what may result in strange behaviour.

class aspecd.annotation.VerticalLine

Bases: aspecd.annotation.PlotAnnotation

Vertical line(s) added to a plot.

Vertical lines are often useful to compare peak positions or as a general guide to the eye of the observer.

The properties of the lines can be controlled in quite some detail using the properties property. Note that all lines will share the same properties. If you need to add lines with different properties to the same plot, use several VerticalLine objects and annotate separately.

parameters

All parameters necessary for the annotation, implicit and explicit

The following keys exist:

positionslist

List of the positions vertical lines should appear at

Values are in axis (data) units.

limitslist

Limits of the vertical lines

If not given, the vertical lines will span the entire range of the current axes.

Values are in relative units, within a range of [0, 1].

Type

dict

properties

Properties of the line(s) within a plot

For the properties that can be set this way, see the documentation of the aspecd.plotting.LineProperties class.

Type

aspecd.plotting.LineProperties

Examples

For convenience, a series of examples in recipe style (for details of the recipe-driven data analysis, see aspecd.tasks) is given below for how to make use of this class. The examples focus each on a single aspect.

Generally and for obvious reasons, you need to have both, a plot task and a plotannotation task. It does not really matter which task you define first, the plot or the plot annotation. There are only marginal differences, and both ways are shown below.

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  properties:
    filename: plot1Dstacked.pdf
  result: plot1Dstacked

- kind: plotannotation
  type: VerticalLine
  properties:
    parameters:
      positions: [35, 42]
    properties:
      color: green
      linewidth: 1
      linestyle: dotted
  plotter: plot1Dstacked

In this case, the plotter is defined first, and the annotation second. To refer to the plotter from within the plotannotation task, you need to set the result attribute in the plotting task and refer to it within the plotter attribute of the plotannotation task. Although defining the plotter before the annotation, the user still expects the annotation to be included in the file containing the actual plot, despite the fact that the figure has been saved (for the first time) before the annotation has been added.

Sometimes, it might be convenient to go the other way round and first define an annotation and afterwards add it to a plot(ter). This can be done as well:

- kind: plotannotation
  type: VerticalLine
  properties:
    parameters:
      positions:
        - 21
        - 42
    properties:
      color: green
      linewidth: 1
      linestyle: dotted
  result: vlines

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  properties:
    filename: plot1Dstacked.pdf
  annotations:
    - vlines

In this way, you can add the same annotation to several plots, and be sure that each annotation is handled as a separate object.

Suppose you have more than one plotter you want to apply an annotation to. In this case, the plotter property of the plotannotation task is a list rather than a string:

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  result: plot1

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  result: plot2

- kind: plotannotation
  type: VerticalLine
  properties:
    parameters:
      positions: [35, 42]
  plotter:
    - plot1
    - plot2

In this case, the annotation will be applied to both plots independently. Note that the example has been reduced to the key aspects. In a real situation, the two plotters will differ much more.

New in version 0.9.

annotate(plotter=None, from_plotter=False)

Annotate a plot(ter) with the given annotation.

If no plotter is provided at method call, but is set as property in the Annotation object, the aspecd.plotting.Plotter.annotate() method of the plotter will be called and thus the history written.

If no plotter is provided at method call nor as property in the object, the method will raise a respective exception.

Parameters
  • plotter (aspecd.plotting.Plotter) – Plot(ter) to annotate

  • from_plotter (bool) –

    whether we are called from within a plotter

    Defaults to “False” and shall never be set manually.

Returns

plotter – Plotter that has been annotated

Return type

aspecd.plotting.Plotter

to_dict(remove_empty=False)

Create dictionary containing public attributes of an object.

Parameters

remove_empty (bool) –

Whether to remove keys with empty values

Default: False

Returns

public_attributes – Ordered dictionary containing the public attributes of the object

The order of attribute definition is preserved

Return type

collections.OrderedDict

Changed in version 0.6: New parameter remove_empty

Changed in version 0.9: Settings for properties to exclude and include are not traversed

Changed in version 0.9.1: Dictionaries get copied before traversing, as otherwise, the special variables __dict__ and __0dict__ are modified, what may result in strange behaviour.

class aspecd.annotation.HorizontalLine

Bases: aspecd.annotation.PlotAnnotation

Horizontal line(s) added to a plot.

Horizontal lines are often useful to compare peak positions or as a general guide to the eye of the observer.

The properties of the lines can be controlled in quite some detail using the properties property. Note that all lines will share the same properties. If you need to add lines with different properties to the same plot, use several HorizontalLine objects and annotate separately.

parameters

All parameters necessary for the annotation, implicit and explicit

The following keys exist:

positionslist

List of the positions horizontal lines should appear at

Values are in axis (data) units.

limitslist

Limits of the horizontal lines

If not given, the horizontal lines will span the entire range of the current axes.

Values are in relative units, within a range of [0, 1].

Type

dict

properties

Properties of the line(s) within a plot

For the properties that can be set this way, see the documentation of the aspecd.plotting.LineProperties class.

Type

aspecd.plotting.LineProperties

Examples

For convenience, a series of examples in recipe style (for details of the recipe-driven data analysis, see aspecd.tasks) is given below for how to make use of this class. The examples focus each on a single aspect.

Generally and for obvious reasons, you need to have both, a plot task and a plotannotation task. It does not really matter which task you define first, the plot or the plot annotation. There are only marginal differences, and both ways are shown below.

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  properties:
    filename: plot1Dstacked.pdf
  result: plot1Dstacked

- kind: plotannotation
  type: HorizontalLine
  properties:
    parameters:
      positions: [35, 42]
    properties:
      color: green
      linewidth: 1
      linestyle: dotted
  plotter: plot1Dstacked

In this case, the plotter is defined first, and the annotation second. To refer to the plotter from within the plotannotation task, you need to set the result attribute in the plotting task and refer to it within the plotter attribute of the plotannotation task. Although defining the plotter before the annotation, the user still expects the annotation to be included in the file containing the actual plot, despite the fact that the figure has been saved (for the first time) before the annotation has been added.

Sometimes, it might be convenient to go the other way round and first define an annotation and afterwards add it to a plot(ter). This can be done as well:

- kind: plotannotation
  type: HorizontalLine
  properties:
    parameters:
      positions:
        - 21
        - 42
    properties:
      color: green
      linewidth: 1
      linestyle: dotted
  result: hlines

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  properties:
    filename: plot1Dstacked.pdf
  annotations:
    - hlines

In this way, you can add the same annotation to several plots, and be sure that each annotation is handled as a separate object.

Suppose you have more than one plotter you want to apply an annotation to. In this case, the plotter property of the plotannotation task is a list rather than a string:

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  result: plot1

- kind: multiplot
  type: MultiPlotter1DStacked
  result: plot2

- kind: plotannotation
  type: HorizontalLine
  properties:
    parameters:
      positions: [35, 42]
  plotter:
    - plot1
    - plot2

In this case, the annotation will be applied to both plots independently. Note that the example has been reduced to the key aspects. In a real situation, the two plotters will differ much more.

New in version 0.9.

annotate(plotter=None, from_plotter=False)

Annotate a plot(ter) with the given annotation.

If no plotter is provided at method call, but is set as property in the Annotation object, the aspecd.plotting.Plotter.annotate() method of the plotter will be called and thus the history written.

If no plotter is provided at method call nor as property in the object, the method will raise a respective exception.

Parameters
  • plotter (aspecd.plotting.Plotter) – Plot(ter) to annotate

  • from_plotter (bool) –

    whether we are called from within a plotter

    Defaults to “False” and shall never be set manually.

Returns

plotter – Plotter that has been annotated

Return type

aspecd.plotting.Plotter

to_dict(remove_empty=False)

Create dictionary containing public attributes of an object.

Parameters

remove_empty (bool) –

Whether to remove keys with empty values

Default: False

Returns

public_attributes – Ordered dictionary containing the public attributes of the object

The order of attribute definition is preserved

Return type

collections.OrderedDict

Changed in version 0.6: New parameter remove_empty

Changed in version 0.9: Settings for properties to exclude and include are not traversed

Changed in version 0.9.1: Dictionaries get copied before traversing, as otherwise, the special variables __dict__ and __0dict__ are modified, what may result in strange behaviour.